Monday, October 23, 2017

General Meeting " GHOSTS of the USS MIDWAY" Guest Speaker from the Midway.

Wednesday  25 October 2017   12 pm    Free for all.



Chula Vista Genealogy Society General Meeting.
"Ghosts of the USS Midway"
Presented by: David Hanson
Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library
(365 F Street, Chula Vista, CA 91910)

David Hanson runs the Midway museum's Curatorial Department, which handles all of the items donated to the museum. While his official title is "Collections Manager", he fills the role of what would be the ship's curator, and is the only paid staff member in the department.
David has held this position since December 2004 (not long after the museum opened to the public). In his spare time he is a military historian, and is the leader of the largest paranormal group in the county (the San Diego Ghost & Paranormal Group), which has over 900 members.

He will give a presentation on the "Ghosts of the USS Midway", in which he will discuss incidents of paranormal encounters aboard the USS Midway both during its active Navy career as well as in more recent years as a museum. These stories came from Midway staff members, visiting guests, and in some cases were personally experienced by himself while he led a professional investigative team around the ship during nine months of paranormal investigations. He considers the USS Midway to be one of the most paranormally active sites in San Diego, though it tries not to dwell upon it. Indeed, disclosures to the public of the Midway's hauntings are rare, and do not occur in any print or media.
The meeting starts promptly at Noon with announcements and introductions. Refreshments and fellowship will complete the program.
Please register soon if you plan to attend this meeting so that we may better plan for this event.
Attendance is free



More information and online registration: CVGS General Meeting 

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Guest Speaker Lemon Grove Library.-- Carole Sobke

Guest Speaker..

"The Giessen Immigration Society : 
Was my 2nd Great Grandfather a Member?"
Presented by: Carole Sobke



WEDNESDAY   18 OCT 2107

6:00 PM TO 7:55 PM



LEMON GROVE LIBRARY
3001 SCHOL LANE,
LEMON GROVE, CA


COME ENOY ANOTHER TALK BY CAROLE SOBKE.
WE LOVED HER BUTTON TALK ABOUT SACREMENTO, CA.

SHE IS A MEMBER OF THE CVGS SOCIETY AND SDGS AND OTHERS.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

20 Random Facts to Add to Your Genealogy.. for future generations to know.




20 random FACTS about yourself that may surprise people.


1. Do you make your bed everyday? Sorta
2. What's your favorite number? 13
3. What's your dream job?  The one I have now, teaching Genealogy.
4. If you could, would you go back to school? YES
5. Can you parallel park? YES
6. A job you had which people would be shocked you once held? Gift Wrapper at Jewelry Store.
7. Do you think aliens are real? Yes, long story and experience
8. Can you drive a stick shift? Yes floor or column
9. Favorite guilty pleasure? Have to think about this.
10. Tattoos? No. 
11. Favorite color? Turquoise.
12. Things people do that drive you insane? Do not get the full facts before commenting.
13. Phobia/fear?  FIRE
14. Favorite childhood game? Hide and Seek later baseball then older basketball. Loved touch football I grew up with lots of boys, cousins and neighbors.
15. Do you talk to yourself?  Yes walk and talk in my sleep.See no rest from my mouth.
16. What story do you adore? The birth of Jesus, Christmas
17. Do you like doing puzzles? Yes
18. Favorite music? Lots of types, almost all types.
19. Tea or coffee? Coffee, 
20. First thing you remember you wanted to be when you grew up?  A newspaper reporter or a teacher.


Do this for your tree. Your Grandchildren may get to know you better.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Time to Pause in Your Life by Susi



It is time  to pause in your life.  Reflect on your past, your hopes for the future and record it for the  next generation or future.

Do not wait until tomorrow, do it now. Add a bit each day,  for tomorrow we are not guaranteed.

Having lost three younger family members in less than a week and a fourth in the week before but was older than I.

If we wait for ??? what is it we are waiting for? It may never come.

My cousin shared all last week all her great plans for the next few months and she is gone now. This I am sure was prompted by the sudden death of her older brother, but still a young man.

Her brother went a few days before. It had her thinking she should begin doing what she was hoping to do and share.  We talked almost daily for some time and at least  weekly before that since her parents became ill.

 Now they are all gone. Just her older brother and her and hubbies children.
I almost do not think they knew what her goals were or wanted. I think she was still forming them.

It was like when she talked to me she became more aware of what she wanted to do.
I spoke to her less than  10 hours before she died. We are going to miss her.

So do not wait, start putting things on paper or computer and gather the things you think are important to your family's future memories.

Look at the fires and the devastation they have done in my home  town area. Almost beyond comprehension except in the early 1960's we had a fire like this.  Gaye LeBaron wrote a very neat article about that fire and it was in Press Democrat today.

Now is not the time to dawdle and wait. Start for your and your family's sake the things you want them to remember and keep.

Looking east look at the Hurricane damage and flooding. It is time to start putting it together.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Tennessee Research, the Vital Beginnings of this Region

   Being of old school I generally start with usgenweb.org.  Having it as a free site for research, and generally carries a  lot of information for most but not all sites.

    
   Having taken and copied a small description of this site,  since I could never do the description so well. ( ) area.

  First we start with the website.     http://www.tngenweb.org/


   Tennessee has 95 counties.  That is a lot of counties for this small state.

    Now to look into the critical knowledge one must have to do proper research in this area.



    (Tennessee is divided into Three Grand Divisions: Eastern, Middle, and Western. Prior to statehood (1796), and even prior to Tennessee’s territorial period (1790-96) there were legal divisions in Tennessee. North Carolina applied these names (at least) to her divisions/districts in her “Western Reserve” or “Western Lands:”

Eastern Division/District
Middle Division/District
Military Division/District
Western Division/District

In 1806, when Tennessee created her Surveyor’s Districts, two land offices were formed. One in East Tennessee, one in West Tennessee. The slight problem is that the “West Tennessee” of those times is really “Middle Tennessee” of today. It seems that there was some consideration given to the fact that all those lands in the 1806 Congressional Reservation (generally the western third of the state) were Chickasaw lands and perhaps never going to really be part of Tennessee. In any case, it does cause genealogists to take a second look when they find an 1810 White Co TN Militia unit in West Tennessee. After the Great Chickasaw Cession of 1818, the area west of the west waters of the Tennessee River became known as Western Tennessee, commonly called West Tennessee.) 


This page site is very critical to your early research. VERY.
It describes the lands descriptions and boundaries early.
People were there long before Daniel Boone, 1673 in fact.
 
I can express how much importance is involved in grasping the boundary changes and the name changes and the States development both NC and VA and TENN  and KY.

It needs read until you can grasp it solidly as you read data about the area you are looking at..

Tennessee was a dominate  part of the eastern state of North Carolina, on the west side, Virginia on the west side, Kentucky south.

There are links here to study and grasp the movement of the people and when.




A very strong piece of the puzzle lies within this statement of the Volunteer State.


 There is a place to add you REV WAR person on this link. or search for one.

Over 2,200 REV WAR Vet Records are on the Pension Rolls.
Now 3,200 show for them.




A special project for Civil WAR .


http://www.tngenweb.org/cemeteries/       Yes, a link for the cemeteries.


More Sources To Check and Learn

Sources to start with besides usgenweb.org and the states of North Carolina and Tennessee and Virginia History are:

Map Guide to American Migration Routes by William Dollarhide.

Pg 5  Excellent description of the land  boundary dispersement.

Excellent map on page 16 showing the boundaries. Printed for all to see and make copy of.

Also on Page 15 it states it discusses 3 states that had to cede their land so that the Federal Government could end the confusion, creating the Northwest Territory 1787.

Virginia gave up it’s western lands, old Fincastle Co. it became Kentucky, 1792

North Carolina gave up some of its western territories creating Tennessee. 1796

Georgia in 1802 gave up its western lands, which added to Mississippi Territory,  later becoming Alabama & Mississippi.

All but Tennessee and Kentucky became Public Domain lands, which then created revenue for the new country to operate and develop.  Prior to this, USA had no funds.

Tennessee Genealogical Research by George W. Schweitzer, Ph.d, & ScD
Pages 8 to 30 vital for knowledge of Tenn.

North Carolina Research by George W. Schweitzer, Ph.d, & ScD
Pages 5 t0 17 adds to this information to help to know where to look when.


 As you can tell I am a firm follower of George W. Schweitzer, Ph.d, & ScD.

 Having attended several of his talks. I was so blessed.

 You will find his books on the other herein states are also very helpful. But you have to start where the county started to find the answers if you are doing early research.  Learning the history of the          region many times helps to keep from you having a brickwall syndrome. 

 Also Tina Sansone of Tennessee, a cousin has some great resources to check out. She is on Facebook also.


  Want more links?  Try the Historical societies, State Archives, Newspapers, tax rolls, land records, school records, government officials of the time element, genealogical societies as the list rolls along.
  Such as Wills, Deeds, Obituaries, Court Documents regarding buying and selling (fruit, vegetables, animals, trees etc). 

Leave no stone unturned.  Lots of Luck.





Friday, October 6, 2017

Tennessee Research by Susi Pentico presented by Gary Brock Bonita-Sunnyside Library

Tennessee Research

Bonita-Sunnyside Library, Sat 7 Oct 1 to 4 pm.   2017

Gary will present the talk. I have to go out of town.  Thank You Gary and God Bless you for stepping in.

 Using William Dollarhide, George W Schweitzer PhD.ScD, USGENWEB.org and other sources shared by Tina Sansone, my cousin.

It will explain the early development of the State of Tenn, a bit on Kentucky and Georgia, Mississippi.

Our early states are not whom we think they are,  just like us

Anyone wanting copies of the sources can let me know and I will email the data to you.

SusiCP@cox.net or SusiCP1@gmail.com

Bless you all.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Two Things To Think About & Do.



 Okay over on my family blog I did a survey that Shirley Becker's daughter posted on  Facebook.
Ok, don't wrinkle your nose but go look at it.  It will help your grandchildren know a bit about  you.
Especially if they did not grow up near you.

http://susischattyperformances.blogspot.com/2017/10/senior-year-in-high-school-record-it.html

Thinking this is a marvelous way to mention some of your past for the younger generation to be aware of your past.

Now the second thing I want to chat about is another persons blog post today. It was written by Family Sleuther.

Posted: 01 Oct 2017 09:35 AM PDT

Some of my close friends say how do you find these clues and add information to your tree or files?

 I loved the comment made that is this on this blog page.

(What could drive a family historian to commit precious time to researching the lives of strangers?)
from above mentioned Blog. 

Suspecting my growing up gave me some clues to do this method and listening to Dr. G Schweitzer, really made this idea grow and be used by myself.

After all, my parents grew up in the same community. Several siblings on each family were always interlinked and intermingled. My Aunts, Uncles, even Great Aunts, Great Uncles were in this neck of the woods.  Great Grandad was there on the Foulk side and then got mad and moved back to Iowa.

Dad told me that story with his eyes twinkling.  The HOFFMAN side came from Iowa because the weather was better in Wheatland area of Wyoming than Monroe/Appanoose Co. area of IA. The moved west and Grandad worked for his DUVALL  cousins.   Dad's Dad(JONES) moved from Iowa, Chickasaw area to Wheatland to live with the cousins DREW's. Of course that brought the FOULK line. DAD'S MOM. Then her parents. 

When we visited we hit Grandparents home first then off to other homes to visit the first day and let them know we were there. YUP took me years to figure the LAWRENCE connection.  Dad's side.
Because they were almost always next. Then the SCOTT's and other family members and when young was always told they were friends.  HULSE< HOLCOMB  two names I am still working on but figure they also must be kin.  Dad always called the lady Grandma HULSE and she did Grandmother him all her life, even when we moved away and to California.

Having many more names that interlinked in my parents conversations of their friends and family, I was able to nail down some from Dad and Mom. Some being on Dad's side we did not know the linkage. 

Mom's mother was a SCOTT, father was a HOFFMAN related to DUVALL.   The FOULK, JONES, LAWRENCE, DREW, HOLCOMB, HULSE LINES , can be tracked back once one starts looking.

I know as parents group up and their siblings married it pulled in many more local names to track.
Interestingly some of them about 3  generation's back were also related. 

Cluster research pays off in huge dividends. 

Family Sluether, thanks for writing that post and to learn how to make it work, look at the chart that is presented and read the information.  I do not think we should ever do research with out looking at the whole instead of picking out the pieces.  You do the pieces when you are stuck and will be confused less often using this method.

Write me and let me know if you gave this a try and tell Family Sleuther thanks for writing this to remind me I should speak up about it.  

Thanks FamilySleuther.